Archive for August, 2014



I remember all of my bosses. Some were bad. Most were good.

 

But only one was, in the best possible way, truly memorable.

 

Unforgettable bosses possess qualities that may not show up on paper but always show up where it matters most — in the minds and even hearts of the people they lead.

 

Here are some of the qualities of truly unforgettable bosses:

 

1. They believe the unbelievable.

 

Most people try to achieve the achievable; that’s why most goals and targets are incremental rather than inconceivable.

 

Memorable bosses expect more — from themselves and from others. Then they show you how to get there. And they bring you along for what turns out to be an unbelievable ride.

 

2. They see opportunity in instability and uncertainty.

 

Unexpected problems, unforeseen roadblocks, major crises… most bosses take down the sails, batten the hatches, and hope to wait out the storm.

 

A few see a crisis as an opportunity. They know it’s extremely difficult to make major changes, even necessary ones, when things are going relatively smoothly.

 

They know reorganizing an entire sales team is accepted more easily when a major customer goes under. They know creating new sales channels is a lot easier when a major competitor enters the market. They know reorganizing manufacturing operations is a lot easier when the flow of supplies and components gets disrupted.

 

Memorable bosses see instability and uncertainty not as a barrier but as an enabler. They reorganize, reshape, and re-engineer to reassure, motivate, and inspire — and in the process make the organization much stronger.

 

3. They wear their emotions on their sleeves.

 

Good bosses are professional.

 

Memorable bosses are highly professional and yet also openly human. They show sincere excitement when things go well. They show sincere appreciation for hard work and extra effort. They show sincere disappointment — not in others, but in themselves. They celebrate, they empathize, they worry. Sometimes they even get frustrated or angry.

 

In short, they’re human. And, unlike many bosses, they act as if they know it.

 

Professionalism is admirable. Professionalism — with a healthy blend of humanity — is inspiring.

 

4. They protect others from the bus.

 

Terrible bosses throw their employees under the bus.

 

Good bosses never throw their employees under the bus.

 

Memorable bosses see the bus coming and pull their employees out of the way often without the employee knowing until much, much later… if ever, because memorable bosses never try to take credit.

 

And if they can’t, they take the hit. (And later speak privately to the employee in question.)

 

5. They’ve been there, done that… and still do that.

 

Dues aren’t paid, past tense. Dues get paid each and every day. The true measure of value is the tangible contribution we make on a daily basis.

 

That’s why no matter what they may have accomplished in the past, memorable bosses are never too good to roll up their sleeves, get dirty, and do the “grunt” work. No job is ever too menial, no task ever too unskilled or boring.

 

Memorable bosses never feel entitled, which means no one feels entitled to anything but the fruits of their labor.

 

6. They lead by permission, not authority.

 

Every boss has a title. That title gives them the right to direct others, to make decisions, to organize and instruct and discipline.

 

Memorable bosses lead because their employees want them to lead. Their employees are motivated and inspired by the person, not the title.

 

Through their words and actions they cause employees feel they work with, not for, a boss. Many bosses don’t even recognize there’s a difference… but memorable bosses do.

 

7. They embrace a larger purpose.

 

A good boss works to achieve company goals.

 

A memorable boss also works to achieve company goals — and achieves more than other bosses — but also works to serve a larger purpose: to advance the careers of employees, to rescue struggling employees, to instill a sense of pride and self-worth in others. They aren’t just remembered for nuts and bolts achievements but for helping others on a personal and individual level.

 

Memorable bosses embrace a larger purpose, because they know business is always personal.

 

8. They take real, not fake risks.

 

Many bosses, like many people, try to stand out in some superficial way. Maybe through their clothes, their interests, or a public display of support for a popular initiative. They do stand out but they stand out for reasons of sizzle, not steak.

 

Memorable bosses stand out because they are willing to take an unpopular stand, take an unpopular step, accept the discomfort of ignoring the status quo, and risk sailing uncharted waters.

 

They take real risks not for the sake of risk but for the sake of the reward they believe possible. And by their example they inspire others to take risks in order to achieve what they believe is possible.

 

In short, memorable bosses inspire others to achieve their dreams: by words, by actions, and most importantly, by example.

 

I would want to add two more crucial pieces to this list.

One is that they trust their team. I’ve had bosses that operate on a need-to-know basis and keep certain pieces of information under wraps or limit access to tools/man power because they think we’re not protective of the brand or we’ll exploit the knowledge for personal gain. I’m here to succeed and grow and that means helping the company to succeed to the best of my ability. Compartmentalizing knowledge can only prevent me and my colleagues from doing what we know how to do.

And second is that they are willing to surround themselves with people who are smarter than they are without fear that those people will overshadow them. An intelligent team headed by a self-confident leader can only do great things in a company!…jp

 

8 Qualities That Make Great Bosses Unforgettable..with 2 added from myself..jp/ Bluewaters2u

#Bluewaters2u


Iraq, August 28, 2014
Gas Oil Law
Nouri al-Maliki and the Islamic Dawa Party took office in Iraq eight years ago. Oil revenues topped $41 billion in 2007 and rose to nearly $86 billion in 2013. Oil production ranged between 2 million barrels per day at the beginning of that period to nearly 3 million barrels at its end.
Maliki’s government made an important decision to call on international oil companies to invest in Iraq to increase [oil] field productivity. Despite the need for modern technology and management, these two factors were not the main reasons behind the decision. Instead, it was the government’s urgent need for additional funds, given the global financial crisis and the declining oil prices at the end of the last decade.
Maliki’s rule will be known as the “post-Mosul ravage” in Iraq’s history. He ended his term by failing to repel the “neo-Nazi” invasion of Mosul and the Ninevah province, where mass murders are being committed against Christians and Yazidis. Militias have displaced the region’s peaceful population and confiscated their homes after painting on them a letter identifying their religion, just as the Nazis did to European Jews during World War II.
Maliki’s rule has ended and the Iraqis still remember what they learned in history books about the Mongol invasion of Baghdad — the burning of libraries and bloodshed, the capturing and selling of women in the slave markets, just as the Islamic State (IS) did in Mosul. History will not forget that the Iraqi army did not defend Mosul’s population, nor will it forget the rampant corruption, as the robbery and loss of billions of dollars has become normal.Maliki has threatened the Iraqi people with opening “the gates of hell” if he is removed from power. It is as if this post is reserved for him and his heirs eternally. Since oil is the mainstay of the Iraqi economy, the first thing that comes to mind is the absence of an oil and gas law in Iraq since 2003, which is normal in light of political differences and the absence of a new social contract. Is Iraq a federal state as stipulated in the constitution or a centralized state? Is there any political will for real coexistence — with middle-ground solutions and understandings that take into account the views of other parties in the state — or is there a tendency for some, especially the Kurds, towards independence from Iraq?

The Iraqi people have not given their final answers to these questions, despite the 2005 constitutional referendum. The Iraqi oil industry has suffered from the absence of a social contract between political leaders. Although oil revenues reached $10 billion a year, it is not enough to build a stable modern state in the absence of an understanding among officials on whether the state is centralized or federal. With no clear contract, oil officials will not be able to rationally manage their sector without this understanding between politicians and their parties.
In fact, the disputes that have prevailed over the country’s politics for the past years — adding Iraq to the group of failed states — resulted from delays caused by a fruitless political polemic. The debate has prevented the parliament, since 2007, from passing the oil and gas law, which attempted to resolve the distribution of privileges and responsibilities of the sector between the federal Ministry of Oil in Baghdad and the authorities in the provinces and regions. The dispute over oil also resulted in the possible division of the country, the exploitation of its weaknesses and its invasion by terrorists.
The draft law is clear. It confirmed that the ownership of oil and gas was for the whole Iraqi people in all regions and provinces.
It also suggested forming a federal council for oil and gas that included officials from the federal government and the provinces and regions, and made the necessary state-level, oil-related decisions through coordination and negotiations between the federal oil ministry and the provinces.
In many of its provisions, the draft reiterates tasking federal authorities with the planning and implementation of oil production in the country, on condition of negotiating and coordinating with the different sides. Such responsibility imposes the presence of a responsible and open government that negotiates with the parties and transfers to them the allocated funds on time, without monopolizing them in Baghdad.
This also means that the parties should specify exactly what they want from Iraq. Do they want to exploit Iraq’s natural wealth, then leave? If this threat resurfaces every time the dispute escalates between Baghdad and Erbil, it will be hard to develop the Iraqi oil industry and stop threats from reaching other regions. Conflicts and perhaps international tribunals would be the only alternatives in such a case.
Iraq must learn from two experiences. The first is the experience of the Council for Reconstruction in the 1950s. At that time, oil revenue was allocated to well-studied reconstruction and infrastructure projects instead of salaries of employees and pensions. Furthermore, [oil revenue] failed to provide electricity and water for citizens, as is currently the case.
Second, Iraq is a country that is almost closed geographically and needs a foreign policy that shields it from wars and conflicts with neighboring regions. The country cannot bear the burden of halting its oil exports for long.
It is understandable that disputes regarding the oil law happen, given the conflicts of interest. However, it is inexcusable to keep inviting global oil companies and increasing production in the absence of this law. This means that Iraq will face many problems in the foreseeable future, whether internally, like the division of the country, or legally due to disputes with the oil companies. The absence of the oil law is as serious as the dissolution of the Iraqi army. They are both pillars of the country, albeit each with a different role.
If the Iraqi governments keep bickering over the same issues and following the policies that have been around since 2003, the only solution would be to change the regime rather than these policies. The doors of hell might then break loose, and this is what Maliki has always feared.
(iraqdirectory)
JP’s Investment Round Table – https://www.facebook.com/groups/413785878651909/
HCL Oil and Gas Law.
HYDROCARBON LAW APPROVAL IS KEY FOR THE FUTURE OF IRAQ.. Bluewaters2u
#Bluewaters2u  #HCLOilandGasLaw #JP’sInvestmentRoundTable #Iraq #BaghdadandErbil
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